Let the Music Speak

By Kristen Love | November 14, 2018

Music has always been a big part of my life. It’s a way that I express myself when I can’t find my own words to: I can easily find a song to fit my mood or situation to express my thoughts and feelings. Around late high school, I decided that I wanted to be a writer and began writing horrible fan fiction in my free time. I was struggling to write  an ending for one of the stories I was … READ MORE…

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Who Art Thou Mona Lisa?

By Brooklyn Davidson | November 7, 2018

I was giddy with unspent energy as I traversed the halls of the Louvre. People shedding their winter coats walked down the checkered hallway, pausing to snap pictures of the headless Nike statue before moving on. Glass skylights illuminated a grand hallway with towering ceilings embellished in ornate carvings. I followed the congested flow of people, my school friends in tow, as we rushed past life-sized battle scenes, mythological images, and picturesque landscapes rendered in remarkable detail. The crowd slowed, … READ MORE…

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Four Influential 20th century Female Horror Writers

By Lauren Kennedy | October 31, 2018

When we think about modern horror, the great and disturbing Stephen King pops into most people’s minds. While King is  wonderfully spooky and influential to one of my favorite literary genres, there are also plenty of women who wrote many creepy tales that impacted the 20th century and the horror genre as a whole. Daphne du Maurier Daphne du Maurier began her writing career in the early 1930s with one of her most successful works being the Gothic novel Rebecca … READ MORE…

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Ten Spooky Book Suggestions

By Kelsey Nannemann | October 5, 2017

October is the perfect month for reading creepy stories. Here are ten books with varying levels of creepiness to get you in the Halloween spirit, pun intended. 1. Ghost Story by Peter Straub “For four aging men in the terror-stricken town of Milburn, New York, an act inadvertently carried out in their youth has come back to haunt them. Now they are about to learn what happens to those who believe they can bury the past — and get away … READ MORE…

Listening to Brian Andreas’ Voices

By Andi Ullrich | September 28, 2017

If you were to stand in the doorway of my room, you would first look forward and see a big window, dying plant, and a cheap rug. Then you’d look to the left to find my bed, dresser, piano, another cheap rug, and pretty much everything else. You wouldn’t notice much to the right of the doorway because really, there’s only a wall. Not until you walked into my room would you give this wall a second glance. And only … READ MORE…

Staff Spotlight – Joseph Zook

By Anna Dore | September 21, 2017

The following is an excerpt from The Persecuted. It is a story about three young adults that are at the wrong place and time. Scientists have created a “smart” shot to increase the intelligence of society, but lost their funding. They continued to make the product, but had no one to test it on, so they kidnap a group of children. Will they survive on their own, or will they have to rely on a stranger for survival? — The Persecuted … READ MORE…

An Interview with Norman, OK’s Self-declared Poet Laureate

By Mary Means | September 14, 2017

Johann Sebastian Baculum (JSB) is the self-declared Poet Laureate of Norman, Oklahoma and star of the podcast Talkulum with J.S. Baculum, an “OETA-rejected series” about himself and his poetry. Mary Means (MM)   How did you come to be the Poet Laureate of Norman, Oklahoma? JSB     Well, I’m a pretty forward thinking individual. I wasn’t just going to wait for them to figure it out. So I decided for them. And I don’t really feel like it’s something that just … READ MORE…

How To Address Writer’s Block

By Joe Zook | September 12, 2017

We all have it. That abrupt halt in the intense, speed-of-light journey that is writing. Some call it writers block, others see it as a need to figure out exactly what they are attempting to say. Whatever we call it (doesn’t matter), we all find ourselves slaves of this mystical force. If I am blocked, which happens too often, I usually just start writing whatever enters my head. I do this until I feel some give to the wall of … READ MORE…

My Childhood in HD – Studio Ghibli Fest 2017

By Emily Brooks | September 7, 2017

I was one of those kids who found a single movie and stuck with it, watching it whenever possible. For me, that movie was Studio Ghibli’s 1986 classic Laputa: Castle in the Sky. Aided by Hayao Miyazaki’s unique art style and directing, which is touched upon in a previous article by Janet Cowden, the film inspired a sense of magic and determination in me, as well as a never-ending desire to be a nefarious, sky-sailing pirate with bushy pink hair. … READ MORE…

My First Loss in the Age of Social Media Grieving

By Anna Dore | September 1, 2017

  This week I unexpectedly lost my best friend, platonic soulmate, and “every day” person. By “every day” person, I mean we had that special relationship where we told each other the little things that don’t seem important to anyone else. I find myself still wanting to text him every time something small happens. Having my entire world turned upside down in the matter of a day was difficult enough, but I never expected to be so horrified by the … READ MORE…

Interview with Constance Squires

By Joshua Barnett | April 27, 2017

I have an audio version of this interview, but the sound quality is terrible, so here’s a text version for you all to enjoy. Constance Squires is the author of the novel Along the Watchtower (Riverhead), which won the 2012 Oklahoma Book Award for Fiction, and a novel and short story collection which are both forthcoming in 2017: Live from Medicine Park (University of Oklahoma Press) and Wounding Radius and Other Stories (Ferry Street). Her short stories have appeared in … READ MORE…

A Letter to My Year as a Student Editor

By Alec Whetsel | April 25, 2017

Dearest Year, You were a challenge. You often lacked oxford commas, which I found annoying, bothersome, and emotionally painful. You presented me with many formatting issues. I will still never understand why anyone chooses to center justify anything. Your crown jewel was the day the internet and, consequentially, Submittable broke. It seemed like you never wanted me to be productive. Between your typos and tight deadlines, I felt like I was going to lose my mind. However, I would not … READ MORE…

Werewolves: Poem by and Interview with David Aristi

By Seth Copeland | April 18, 2017

by Seth Copeland, Publishing Editor Sydney Vance, Senior Poetry Editor Werewolf Viejo By David Aristi Gold been beaten outta me by Every passing year, lo que queda Funciona despacio — what’s left Works slowly. The beastly things I miss, but in war, South Central, or in Juarez Juárez La Jodida Or think Aleppo, those goat & sheep sins would be laughable Today Confieso porque me he vuelto demasiado viejo para presidió — I confess because I just turned too old … READ MORE…