China’s Top 3 Ancient Books

By Wenchuan Hu | April 19, 2018

China, known as one of the world’s four ancient civilizations, and the written history of China dates back to the Shang Dynasty which is over 3,000 years ago. In such a long history, literature has an important position at all times. Here are China’s top 3 ancient books, which all have historical significance and remain valuable today. Three Character Classic It served as a child’s first formal education at home from 13 century to even late 18 century. The text … READ MORE…

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Submitting to a Literary Magazine

By Kelly McConnell | April 12, 2018

Do you have some stories or poems you want to publish in literary magazines, but you don’t know how and where to start? Have no fear, for I am here to tell you how! Follow along as I take you on a step-by-step process, and then you’ll be able to submit your work in no time. STEP ONE: FIND LITERARY MAGAZINES TO SUBMIT TO Pretty simple step, right? But it’s important to know how to classify your work so that … READ MORE…

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Orality vs. Literacy

By Alexandria Sanders | April 5, 2018

In Walter Ong’s Orality and Literacy, he noted the differences between literate and illiterate cultures. Ong emphasized speech being the primary and more vital language used as opposed to written texts. Although speech is still prominent over writing, this current “high technology” age gives writing more weight on a scale of importance. This ability to write and record gives us a wider range of accessible knowledge than oral cultures.             Literate cultures exist in a world where a great amount, … READ MORE…

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On Workshopping

By Sydney Vance | April 4, 2017

Roughly four years ago when I was a freshman in college, I submitted one of my poems to three different journals. This was the very first time I attempted to share my poetry. Armed with the hope that the editorial board would fall desperately in love with my work and immediately, breathlessly, and without pause accept the piece (ah, the naiveté!), I waited. Of course—you can see where this is heading, right?—during the following weeks, the rejection letters came in … READ MORE…

The Alexander Lawrence Posey Speaker Series

By Seth Copeland | March 30, 2017

“Lo! what a vivid picture here, Of sin and purity, Here where the rivers join their Floods and journey to the sea.” —“Where the Rivers Meet”   Writer, philanthropist, and statesman Alexander Lawrence Posey (1873-1908) was one of the first indigenous Americans to gain national acclaim in letters. His series of editorials, later collected as the Fus Fixico Letters, commented satirically and pointedly on contemporary social issues of indigenous people in America at the turn of the century. Posey also … READ MORE…

A Celebration of Hayao Miyazaki

By Janet Cowden | March 28, 2017

The blank page is a canvas for artists who paint with words, but Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki, co-founder of Studio Ghibli, a Japanese animated film studio, uses the blank page to hand draw most of his movies. According to a past interview, Miyazaki said that his movies only contain 10% CGI work.

Alexander Lawrence Posey Speaker Series featuring Danez Smith

By Joshua Barnett | March 23, 2017

In the Fall semester, we have a very solidified series called Sherman Chaddlesone Arts and Letters Lecture Series, and for a while, we’ve known we wanted something in the Spring. Where our Sherman Chaddlesone series features Native Americans, our Alexander Lawrence Posey Series will feature artists who represent otherness that so often may not be spoken for. This is in an effort to combat erasure and the silencing of diminished voices. Our inaugural event on March 30th will feature Danez … READ MORE…

(W)riter (o)f (C)olor: A Perspective

By Kellyn Eaddy | March 21, 2017

When I was young and inexperienced, all of the characters I made were, by default, white. To put this into perspective, I am of mixed race, black and Filipino, and grew up in a predominantly black and Filipino world. I like to joke that I could count on one hand the number of white people I knew growing up, but thinking back, I’m not sure that’s an exaggeration. And as much as I love my cultures, and I celebrate who I … READ MORE…

5 Tips For A Great Spring Break For Writers

By Anna Dore | March 9, 2017

Many of us will soon be starting spring break – a glorious week off from the stresses of school. Some will be jetting off to the beach; others will be picking up extra shifts at work. No matter what your plan is, here are some tips to use this time wisely as a writer. 1. Don’t forget about the BREAK part of spring break. Whether you’re an English major, or you’ve been tirelessly working on your next great novel, sometimes … READ MORE…

SP 17 Update

By Joshua Barnett | March 7, 2017

New Plains Review has come a long way over the past thirty years, and we continue to implement and expand ideas to further enhance not only our journal, but the overall artistic community. I am quickly closing in on my 1-year anniversary of bring Editor-in-Chief for the journal, and I cannot help but to reflect on the previous 2 years as an Associate Editor. Our online presence has grown more in the last 9 months than it had the previous decade, and … READ MORE…

5 Tips To Get Published in a Journal

By Anna Dore | March 2, 2017

We know you want to be published, and we know it can be daunting. So we, New Plains Review, present to you a brief list of precautionary measures you should take before submitting your work to anywhere. (But primarily to us, right?) 1. Research the journal itself Every journal has a specific form and style. You want to make sure you’re submitting to the right kind of journal for your work. 2. Read the Directions READ THE DIRECTIONS. I can’t … READ MORE…

Transformation through The Written Word: An Interview with Arin Andrews

By Andi Ullrich | February 28, 2017

Arin Andrews is a transgender advocate, mountain-climbing extraordinaire, and student at Oklahoma State University. He’s also the author of Some Assembly Required, a memoir that expounds upon his experience as a transgender youth. On his Facebook page, you may find pictures of his climbing adventures, road trips, and loved ones. His courageous and free spirit was apparent during our interview. Knowing he wrote a memoir, and myself majoring in English, I wanted to ask him about his own experience with … READ MORE…

Local Open Mic Provides Space For Unique Performances

By Anna Dore | February 23, 2017

The Oklahoma City creative community has seen a lot of exciting growth in the past few years, and if you haven’t had a chance to check out local open mics, you’re truly missing out! Comics, singers, magicians, and all other artists are able to show off and improve their skills in welcoming environments around the city through these opportunities.