“Where are you from?”

By Edward Callery | October 17, 2018

While easy enough to answer for most people, it exists to some of us as one of the most complicated questions in our lives. It’s an impossibly loaded interrogation that has been long embodied in the small-talk canon, not taking into account a large number of factors that may distort the reply, and not caring. It demands a simple answer, a recognizable place on the map. It doesn’t take into account those of us that just don’t know, whether it … READ MORE…

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A Little Like Magic

By Brooklyn Davidson | October 10, 2018

An orange flyer hung on the wall, it’s bold words issuing a challenge. Read one hundred books; win one hundred dollars. I was a third grader with fifty-two cents in my pocket and only a Razor scooter to my name. One hundred dollars sounded like a fortune. Little did I know, I would be getting something worth more than a hundred dollars. The school librarian dropped a stack of stapled papers on the table and called us to attention. Entry … READ MORE…

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Being the Black Girl

By Kyra Foreman | October 3, 2018

Writing has been a part of my life since I learned cursive in the third grade, but I didn’t fall madly in love with it until well into my high school years, where I was often known as the “Black One” or “That Black Girl with the Weird Hair.” Writing became the channel that I never knew I needed. I struggled with my identity as a Black girl and what it means to be black. People often tried to quantify … READ MORE…

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The Alexander Lawrence Posey Speaker Series

By Seth Copeland | March 30, 2017

“Lo! what a vivid picture here, Of sin and purity, Here where the rivers join their Floods and journey to the sea.” —“Where the Rivers Meet”   Writer, philanthropist, and statesman Alexander Lawrence Posey (1873-1908) was one of the first indigenous Americans to gain national acclaim in letters. His series of editorials, later collected as the Fus Fixico Letters, commented satirically and pointedly on contemporary social issues of indigenous people in America at the turn of the century. Posey also … READ MORE…

A Celebration of Hayao Miyazaki

By Janet Cowden | March 28, 2017

The blank page is a canvas for artists who paint with words, but Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki, co-founder of Studio Ghibli, a Japanese animated film studio, uses the blank page to hand draw most of his movies. According to a past interview, Miyazaki said that his movies only contain 10% CGI work.

Alexander Lawrence Posey Speaker Series featuring Danez Smith

By Joshua Barnett | March 23, 2017

In the Fall semester, we have a very solidified series called Sherman Chaddlesone Arts and Letters Lecture Series, and for a while, we’ve known we wanted something in the Spring. Where our Sherman Chaddlesone series features Native Americans, our Alexander Lawrence Posey Series will feature artists who represent otherness that so often may not be spoken for. This is in an effort to combat erasure and the silencing of diminished voices. Our inaugural event on March 30th will feature Danez … READ MORE…

(W)riter (o)f (C)olor: A Perspective

By Kellyn Eaddy | March 21, 2017

When I was young and inexperienced, all of the characters I made were, by default, white. To put this into perspective, I am of mixed race, black and Filipino, and grew up in a predominantly black and Filipino world. I like to joke that I could count on one hand the number of white people I knew growing up, but thinking back, I’m not sure that’s an exaggeration. And as much as I love my cultures, and I celebrate who I … READ MORE…

5 Tips For A Great Spring Break For Writers

By Anna Dore | March 9, 2017

Many of us will soon be starting spring break – a glorious week off from the stresses of school. Some will be jetting off to the beach; others will be picking up extra shifts at work. No matter what your plan is, here are some tips to use this time wisely as a writer. 1. Don’t forget about the BREAK part of spring break. Whether you’re an English major, or you’ve been tirelessly working on your next great novel, sometimes … READ MORE…

SP 17 Update

By Joshua Barnett | March 7, 2017

New Plains Review has come a long way over the past thirty years, and we continue to implement and expand ideas to further enhance not only our journal, but the overall artistic community. I am quickly closing in on my 1-year anniversary of bring Editor-in-Chief for the journal, and I cannot help but to reflect on the previous 2 years as an Associate Editor. Our online presence has grown more in the last 9 months than it had the previous decade, and … READ MORE…

5 Tips To Get Published in a Journal

By Anna Dore | March 2, 2017

We know you want to be published, and we know it can be daunting. So we, New Plains Review, present to you a brief list of precautionary measures you should take before submitting your work to anywhere. (But primarily to us, right?) 1. Research the journal itself Every journal has a specific form and style. You want to make sure you’re submitting to the right kind of journal for your work. 2. Read the Directions READ THE DIRECTIONS. I can’t … READ MORE…

Transformation through The Written Word: An Interview with Arin Andrews

By Andi Ullrich | February 28, 2017

Arin Andrews is a transgender advocate, mountain-climbing extraordinaire, and student at Oklahoma State University. He’s also the author of Some Assembly Required, a memoir that expounds upon his experience as a transgender youth. On his Facebook page, you may find pictures of his climbing adventures, road trips, and loved ones. His courageous and free spirit was apparent during our interview. Knowing he wrote a memoir, and myself majoring in English, I wanted to ask him about his own experience with … READ MORE…

Local Open Mic Provides Space For Unique Performances

By Anna Dore | February 23, 2017

The Oklahoma City creative community has seen a lot of exciting growth in the past few years, and if you haven’t had a chance to check out local open mics, you’re truly missing out! Comics, singers, magicians, and all other artists are able to show off and improve their skills in welcoming environments around the city through these opportunities.

Review: Kaveh Akbar’s Portrait of the Alcoholic

By Seth Copeland | February 21, 2017

(Sibling Rivalry Press, 2017) The spider weaves the curtains in the palace of the Caesars… —Saadi Shirazi (1210-1291) From the start, Kaveh Akbar makes it abundantly clear who the audience is for Portrait of the Alcoholic. His debut chapbook is dedicated simply “for drunks.” Writers as alcoholics is a trope older than feudalism, and is codified all over this past century, from the exploits (and death) of Dylan Thomas to the better (and worse) tomes of Bukowski. Akbar’s collection is … READ MORE…